Europe’s most beautiful hidden villages

Of course you could travel to Paris, Barcelona, or Rome, but tucked away beyond the big cities are some truly beautiful destinations. To get you started, here are some of our favorite hidden villages in Europe.

Bornholm, Denmark

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The island of Bornholm might not be a secret for Danes, but it’s new to many foreigners. It’s a popular summer getaway spot for locals, with a fantastic coastline, great opportunities for outdoor activities, and a rich history. You can also visit the tiny nearby isle of Christiansø, which served as a fortress during World War II. The island is home to just a few houses, but you’ll find an inn that our local representative says serves the very best smoked herring!

 

Gruyères, Switzerland

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Gruyères is nestled in the foothills of the Alps, providing some truly lovely scenery. You’ve probably heard of its namesake cheese, but the village of Gruyères is also home to 800 years of history, a castle, and several museums – including the newer Tibet Museum, which houses over 300 works of sculpture, art, and artifacts from the Himalayas. And yes, you can learn all about the town’s traditional cheese-making heritage!

 

Castell’Arquato, Italy

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It seems like there’s no end to the beautiful little towns you can stumble upon in Italy, but Castell, with its perfectly preserved medieval architecture, stunning valley views, and traditional food will transport you back in time like no other. Be sure to visit the Praetorian Palace (now used as the town hall), built in 1293 and the church on the piazza, a striking example of Romanesque construction built in 1122.

 

Giethoorn, The Netherlands

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The small village of Giethoorn was settled in the early 1200s, and its old fashioned spirit remains intact to this day. What makes Giethoorn especially unique is the lack of roads! Locals travel by foot or by boat, which gives this town the nickname “the Venice of the north.” If you don’t mind a little paddling, a visit to this unique village is the perfect way to slow down.

 

Hollókő, Hungary

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After the Mongol invasion of the 13th century, Hollókő castle was built to protect the area from future attacks. Control of the area was disputed for more than 150 years, and it wasn’t until 1683 that the village was abandoned and present-day Hollókő was built. Today, this UNESCO World Heritage Site is home to just 387 residents, but you can visit the castle, church, and museums and take part in the town’s annual Easter celebration.

 

Saint-Suliac, France

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The village of Saint-Suliac sits on the Rance Estuary. It’s a humble fishing port, but widely regarded as one of the most beautiful towns in all of France. You can take guided walking, bicycle, or kayak tours of the area, passing by wildflowers, granite cottages decorated with fishing nets, and the 12th century church.

 

Casares, Spain

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Located in southern Spain’s Andalusia region, this beautiful village is perfect photography destination; its buildings are all white. While this isn’t uncommon in Andalusia, many of the other “pueblos blancos” tend to cater more to tourists than locals. Casares has a relaxed, authentic atmosphere. Follow any of its narrow streets uphill and you’ll find breathtaking views.

 

Motovun, Croatia

Croatiaphoto credit: Randy Durrum via photopin cc

This tiny, hilltop village in Istria County is home to only 500 residents. Located away from the vibrant beach towns, Motovun is situated in the peaceful countryside. For a little more excitement, visit during the Motovun Film Festival, held annually in late July or early August. And don’t forget to try the truffles; these Istrian delicacies are coveted the world over.

Have you ever been to one of these hidden villages? Tell us about it in the comments!

5 Comments on “Europe’s most beautiful hidden villages

  1. Interesting article! Thanks for sharing. I would be travelling to Denmark this August, some more information pertaining to Denmark, more than touristic views would help.
    Thanks!
    Gayatri Kale

  2. My father was from Casares, I first visited as a toddler in 1958. The last time was in 1982. I will be returning with my sister and niece this summer.

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